Flag Day

Flag Day is celebrated on June 14 in the United States. The date commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. The flag was called the Flag Resolution of 1777 and was the first of many iterations of what would become the American flag we recognize today.

The following photos were taken out and about:  Dallas, Texas – Great Falls, Montana – Las Vegas, and Los Angeles and right around the corner in my little town of Canby.

 

Sightseeing in California

I recently packed my bags, loaded up the Pup and took a short road trip with Hubby in the Big Blue Truck. Destination: California! Our first stop was Sacramento to visit friends. We took a day trip to Amador Flower Farm and walked the daylily fields. And you know we filled the back of her car with plants to take home!

Heading south to Long Beach, Hubby and I went to see the Queen Mary, docked in the harbor. Christened in 1934 by Queen Mary herself, she has carried royality, WWII troops and war brides, presidents and heads of state, movie stars and celebrities across the Atlantic.  The RMS Queen Mary has been in her Longbeach berth since 1967, and used as a movie set for numerous movies including The Aviator, Pearl Harbor and Parent Trap 2.

Just down the road we found ourselves on board another ship, this one with a very different purpose. The battleship USS Iowa, the largest battleship in the US fleet. We were able to tour the ship from top to bottom. I even had the privilege of being able to see areas of the ship off the tour route to view several of the murals on the ships bulkhead. She served our country from 1939 – 1990, and carried the nicknames “The Big Stick” (1952), and “The Grey Ghost” (Korean War).

 

While these ships have very different missions, they also shared a common purpose. Both ships earned their keep in the service of their countries during the war:RMS Queen Mary carrying Winston Churchill on diplomatic missions – USS Iowa transported Franklin Roosevelt across the Atlantic for the same reason. From a bygone era to more modern times, their current roll telling their stories is priceless.

*S.  If you need me, I’ll be in the garden. 

To view photos individually click a photo to open the slideshow.

A rainy walk through the Cecil & Molly Smith Garden (of Rhododendrons)

Today it rained.  Not a big deal, really, if you live in Western Oregon.  The thing is, yesterday and the four days before were sunny an beautiful!  With nothing to do but play in the garden yesterday, I was looking forward to the monthly meeting with my HPSO study group.  (Hardy Plant Society of Oregon).  And naturally, the weather took a wet turn.

But we are a pretty hardy group, and a little rain will never stop us from coming together to enjoy a great garden, landscape, nursery or lunch spot!  So this morning we met underneath dripping leaves, holding umbrellas, to walk through a little gem of a garden in St. Paul, Oregon. Cecil & Molly Smith Garden is planted under a canopy of native Douglas firs.  The many pathways take you on a tour of wooded views featuring the over 600 rhododendrons and azaleas.  Under-planted with myriad woodland species – there is something beautiful to see at every turn.

From the entrance we walked under towering trees, around corners to hillsides planted with ferns, false Solomon’s seal, bleeding hearts, hellebore’s, trillium, and even Jack-in-the-pulpit (arisaema triphyllum).  We admired the new foliage on these amazing plants, oohh’d and ahhh’d over blooms ranging in size from a thimble to the size of a teacup.  We even spotted a lovely banana slug, which was duly admired by myself and a Master Gardener friend that specializes in educating the public on slugs and snails.

It was a beautiful day – even with the rain.  In fact, I would have to say that the rain enhanced the beauty of the grounds and the foliage in the forest.

Enjoy the photos – to view the photos in a slideshow format simply click on the first photo and go from there.

*S.   If you need me, I will be in the garden

Two Oregon Tourists in Florence: The Basilica of San Croce

On our first day in Florence we set out on our adventure. I wanted to see and learn something about this historic city we had come to visit. 

And I have a confession to make here, I first learned about the Basilica of San Croce from the movie ‘A Room with a View’.  The heroine, Lucy Honeychurch, sets out to explore the city like we did, and finds herself at the Basilica San Croce. The movie doesn’t reveal much, but I knew I wanted to see it for myself. 

San Croce was commissioned to be built in 1294, and is the largest Franciscan church in the world. The nave (worship area) is covered with delicate and intricate artwork telling stories of  faith. Lined with alcoves, some are marked for prayer with candles – each has a separate story. The grand altar at the front if the church commands attention with the colorful frescos painted on the walls. The floors have many intricately decorated tombs. Some are so worn after centuries of worship the words and figures barely recognizable. The room is quite impressive with its size and all there is to see.

Passing through a chamber leading out of the main sactuary we saw these renderings of The Madonna and baby. The simplicity of the images is quite moving. 

The above series of photos was taken in the Medici Chapel of the novices, reserved for the novice monks. The paintings were created on such a grand scale! With life-like detail and rich colors they almost look three dimensional.  Its awe inspiring to think of the materials and processes the artists worked with in the 13th century to create such works. 

The hallmark of early churches and cathedrals is the beautiful stained glass and frescos that adorn the walls and ceilings. This display of these pieces allowed you to see the detail up close.  I was again struck by the rich colors and texture of the artwork, and the materials used to create them. 

This next series of photos tells a different story, not about the art, or the city, but of the men that created it. 

On the opposite side of the altar the massive room holds tributes to several great men. It was this section of the church that moved me the most. 

Galileo’s tomb, and a beautiful tribute to the man and his work. 

Dante’s cenotaph. Philosopher and son of Florence, he was exiled during the Inquisition and buried elsewhere. 


The most impressive of the tombs is Michelangelo’s, as you can see.

I feel awed to have had the opportunity to visit this beautiful place. The stories told here are so familar and told so often, but I don’t tire of the images and all the different mediums the artists use to tell the story. 

Two Oregon tourists in Florence, Italy

It was a week ago that T* and I flew out of our little corner of the world, looking for some new views, & to make some memories.And so far we have done both!

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But I must say, this tourist gig is darn hard work! Between getting to our transportation on time (after figuring out how it works, that is), seeing the sites, then keeping up with all the photos we are taking to share with you all I am exhausted! But every night I fall asleep with a smile on my face, because we are in Italy!

And you can follow along on our visit. Enjoy the photos, and the story.

Our Florence adventure began when we opened the door to the B & B where we spent 3 nights. The house was built in the 1300’s. Holy wow! And the street it was located on is the oldest in the city.

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Florence is built alongside the peaceful Arno river. The famous Ponte Vecchio spans the river, with it its shops and throngs of tourists. Our room was a block away from the river, and we found ourselves crossing the bridges countless times during our stay. We watched the sunset, found the famous Love Locks and even watched fireworks with the crowd.

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There was so much to see in the many piazzas – modern art, centuries old churches with their classic domes and towers, a carousel, and so much people watching! Each hour the city walls echo with the music of the church bells tolling, and at night the historic buildings are bathed in light. We heard street music ranging from solo guitar players to an acapala mens group and symphony music. Chalk artists spend hours re-creating masterpieces on the ancient brick sidewalks, only to wash them away at the end of the night.

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We spotted graffiti in many places. Of course there was the usual writing on the walls. Florence is home to a French graffiti artist called Clet. We spotted his work and enjoyed his sense of humor, no translation needed.

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The views are classic, the buildings timeless. Even everyday views seem special in the jewel light of Florence.

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On our first day we visited the Basilica of San Croce. It was breathtaking. Here are a few teaser pics. I have much to say about our time there, so I will devote another post to our visit.

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April 2 *St. Johns Bridge

Today I decided to get my camera on and shoot the bridge in St. Johns, Oregon.  So I loaded the Pup into the truck, and off we went.  I had hoped for more sunshine, to produce more shadows.  But of course springtime in Oregon comes with lots of cloud cover, especially in Portland, near those two big rivers.

The St. Johns Bridge was built in 1931 with two Gothic towers holding up the suspension bridge.  It’s also the tallest bridge in Oregon.  But if you want more facts than that you will have to Google it.  The real thing about this bridge, and Cathedral Park below the span is that I just love it.  It reminds me of my beloved Big Mac (Mackinaw Bridge in Michigan) and just has a great industrial vibe about it.  Many years ago, when our kids were small and we had a boat we would run down the Willamette River and sit near her span and marvel at the way she looked.

Now days she is a destination when we feel like driving, but not too far, and want to look at man-made wonders.  Or to place our cars underneath and take pretty pictures. Today I just wanted to get the bridge, and with the trees not all leafed out yet, that is just what I got!

Enjoy!

the trees are just beginning to bloom below the bridge

the trees are just beginning to bloom below the bridge

this angle really highlights the supports beneath the bridge.

this angle really highlights the supports beneath the bridge.

showing off the cyan color of the bridge.

showing off the cyan color of the bridge.

the real workers, the supports beneath, standing here you can really sense the power of the road by the thunder the traffic above creates.

the real workers, the supports beneath, standing here you can really sense the power of the road by the thunder the traffic above creates.

one of my first shots, its my favorite

one of my first shots, its my favorite

here I played with the now common filter effect of HDR toning.

here I played with the now common filter effect of HDR toning.

this effect is basically monotone to show off the Gothic towers.

this effect is basically monotone to show off the Gothic towers and the famous Portland clouds.

a day at the beach*

Summertime has left the Northwest, leaving the golden days of Autumn to take her place.

We had a really great summer here, lots of nice days, plenty of hot days (and don’t tell anyone) hardly any rain.  Really it was the perfect Northwest summer.

On the 88th day of summer I decided to take a drive …. to the coast. The ocean had waited for me all year, thru late winter and all of the damp spring, I didn’t want summer to slide into fall without some sand between my toes.   And the weather was forecast to be perfect; 70’s with no wind!

The pup and I jumped into the truck and went for a drive taking us through our small town, into the urban area around Portland and finally to Sunset highway; US 26 that ends at the Pacific Ocean in Seaside, Oregon.  The drive was part of the reason for the journey.  It’s pretty scenic, running through the field and hills that usher you into the coast range of mountains. I think the summit was around 1500 feet.  The winding road is a pleasurable challenge, and the traffic was nearly non-existent.

I reached my destination a bit after 12 noon, Canon Beach, just south of Seaside.  The town was pretty crowded with shoppers strolling the sidewalks and chatting in the late summer sun.  We headed out of town and found a street to park on with a path to the beach, just south of the landmark Haystack rock.  We had found our spot for the afternoon!

In the 3 or 4 hours that I was there I walked on the sand to photograph the rocks, ate the lunch that I brought with me, talked on the phone to hubby who couldn’t be there with me, walked the pup on the sand ….  you get the idea.  We talked to many others out there enjoying the calm, 70 degree day; a woman from Ohio visiting her son and seeing the Pacific for the first time, an elderly man visiting his daughter, and when Rayne decided to chase a long-haired Chihuahua I got to talk to a newly engaged couple; she was from North Carolina and he was from Beaverton.  We had a nice chat about the dogs and the sites to see on the coast.

My intention was to leave before the sun went down, and I did manage to tear myself away. But not before one more stop, to the viewpoint at Ecola Beach State Park.  The winding road to the park was worth it, when I get to the cliff overlooking the water the sun was just beginning to dip into sunset mode, and I captured some great pre-sunset photos.

As I drove away I realized how relaxed I was from my short day at the coast.  There is something about the light of late summer, and the sun moving so much faster across the skies.  I just love it.

Here are some of the photos from that afternoon.  Nothing too dramatic; just the blue sky, the rock formations and the surf against the sand.

* Ecola beach is where the Lewis and Clark expedition traveled to see a beached whale, accompanied by Sacajawea.  They called the beach Ecola after the Chinook name for Whale.

link a matching post:  *snapshots at the beach